Charles Purvis

On July 10, 1893, Lieutenant Charles Purvis, of the Chicago Fire Department, along with twelve other firefighters died in the line of duty while fighting the White City Fire of 1893 at the Chicago World’s Fair. The Cold Storage Building was one of the largest buildings at the fair and was a technological marvel of 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago, making ice, keeping meat cold and boasting an indoor ice-skating rink. Like many buildings at the Fair, the Cold Storage building was erected quickly with little concern for safety. On July 10th, the alarm sounded at 1:30 p.m. when a small fire at the top of the flue stack was spotted. fire erupted in the building killing 17 people in total in front of a crowd of tens of thousands of onlookers. The responders came from the World’s Fair fire service and the local fire station, which was only a few blocks away.

Burton Page

On July 10, 1893, Captain Burton Page, of the Chicago Fire Department, along with twelve other firefighters died in the line of duty while fighting the White City Fire of 1893 at the Chicago World’s Fair. The Cold Storage Building was one of the largest buildings at the fair and was a technological marvel of 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago, making ice, keeping meat cold and boasting an indoor ice-skating rink. Like many buildings at the Fair, the Cold Storage building was erected quickly with little concern for safety. On July 10th, the alarm sounded at 1:30 p.m. when a small fire at the top of the flue stack was spotted. fire erupted in the building killing 17 people in total in front of a crowd of tens of thousands of onlookers. The responders came from the World’s Fair fire service and the local fire station, which was only a few blocks away.

James Garvey

On July 10, 1893, Captain James Garvey ,of the Chicago Fire Department, along with twelve other firefighters died in the line of duty while fighting the White City Fire of 1893 at the Chicago World’s Fair. The Cold Storage Building was one of the largest buildings at the fair and was a technological marvel of 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago, making ice, keeping meat cold and boasting an indoor ice-skating rink. Like many buildings at the Fair, the Cold Storage building was erected quickly with little concern for safety. On July 10th, the alarm sounded at 1:30 p.m. when a small fire at the top of the flue stack was spotted. fire erupted in the building killing 17 people in total in front of a crowd of tens of thousands of onlookers. The responders came from the World’s Fair fire service and the local fire station, which was only a few blocks away.

James Fitzpatrick

On July 10, 1893, Captain James Fitzpatrick of the Chicago Fire Department, along with twelve other firefighters died in the line of duty while fighting the White City Fire of 1893 at the Chicago World’s Fair. The Cold Storage Building was one of the largest buildings at the fair and was a technological marvel of 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago, making ice, keeping meat cold and boasting an indoor ice-skating rink. Like many buildings at the Fair, the Cold Storage building was erected quickly with little concern for safety. On July 10th, the alarm sounded at 1:30 p.m. when a small fire at the top of the flue stack was spotted. fire erupted in the building killing 17 people in total in front of a crowd of tens of thousands of onlookers. The responders came from the World’s Fair fire service and the local fire station, which was only a few blocks away.

Mashawn Jermaine Plummer

Mashawn Jermaine Plummer

Mashawn Jermaine “Shawn” Plummer was born June 21, 1991. He attended Oliver Wendell Holmes, a Chicago Public School, for his elementary education. Mashawn loved comic books, especially Marvels; Iron Man and Spiderman were his favorite. For three years, he attended Hales Franciscan Private High School, one of only two all black male high schools in Chicago at that time. At Hales, the school creed was “Unto Perfect Manhood.” Mashawn would come to seek and strive every day to fulfill those words.

After leaving Hales, he attended Eisenhower High School in Blue Island for one year to become a stronger football player. He played football for and graduated from Quincy University. Shawn was a diehard Chicago Bears fan; win or lose, he was riding with the Bears. He was a deep thinker and mature beyond his 30 years. He was our hero! Shawn loved family and showed his love every time he could. He was that ray of light that brightened any room. He was a momma’s boy and didn’t care who knew.

Mashawn always knew he wanted a career of service, and that led him to the Chicago Fire Department. He truly loved being a firefighter/EMT. He passed the firefighter/EMT exam in his third year of college and waited patiently for over six years to be called to service. During those years he worked in logistics management. At the fire academy, Mashawn helped many fellow candidates study for their exams and motivated them mentally and physically to not give up during their training. Although his career ended far too soon, he was a hero to many and will never be forgotten.

December 1, 2021, was his one-year anniversary; he was so proud. He told his mom and dad that he was finally doing a job with purpose and giving back by making a difference through his service as a firefighter/EMT. Mashawn was tragically injured on December 16, 2021 and succumbed to those injuries five days later. He had a goal to work hard and someday rise to the rank of chief. Mashawn also planned to start a football program that would mentor disadvantaged boys on the southside of Chicago and teach them about careers as a first responder.

Mashawn leaves to cherish his memory a deeply grieving family and many friends that miss him dearly. Life will never be the same without him, but we all take solace in knowing he was happy being a firefighter. CFD allowed our Superhero to do what he loved. Mashawn coined the phrase MTAP: Make Them All Proud. He did just that every day of his life!

William Weber

Driver William Weber

In the early morning hours of December 22, 1910, an electrical fire broke out in a refrigerated warehouse at the Nelson Morris and Company facility in Chicago, IL. Over 50 engine companies responded to the incident, but because the city’s fire hydrants were shut off for the winter to prevent freezing, the blaze quickly spread out of control. The warehouse collapsed in the direction of the firefighters, burying dozens in the rubble and flames. Driver William Weber, along with twenty-two other firefighters, were killed by the falling debris.

Frank Walters

Pipeman Frank Walters

In the early morning hours of December 22, 1910, an electrical fire broke out in a refrigerated warehouse at the Nelson Morris and Company facility in Chicago, IL. Over 50 engine companies responded to the incident, but because the city’s fire hydrants were shut off for the winter to prevent freezing, the blaze quickly spread out of control. The warehouse collapsed in the direction of the firefighters, burying dozens in the rubble and flames. PM Frank Walters, along with twenty-two other firefighters, were killed by the falling debris.

William Sturm

Lieutenant William Sturm

In the early morning hours of December 22, 1910, an electrical fire broke out in a refrigerated warehouse at the Nelson Morris and Company facility in Chicago, IL. Over 50 engine companies responded to the incident, but because the city’s fire hydrants were shut off for the winter to prevent freezing, the blaze quickly spread out of control. The warehouse collapsed in the direction of the firefighters, burying dozens in the rubble and flames. Lieutenant William Sturm, along with twenty-two other firefighters, were killed by the falling debris.

Edward Schonsett

Truckman Edward Schonsett

In the early morning hours of December 22, 1910, an electrical fire broke out in a refrigerated warehouse at the Nelson Morris and Company facility in Chicago, IL. Over 50 engine companies responded to the incident, but because the city’s fire hydrants were shut off for the winter to prevent freezing, the blaze quickly spread out of control. The warehouse collapsed in the direction of the firefighters, burying dozens in the rubble and flames. Truckman Edward Schonsett, along with twenty other firefighters, were killed by the falling debris.

Peter Powers

Truckman Peter Powers

In the early morning hours of December 22, 1910, an electrical fire broke out in a refrigerated warehouse at the Nelson Morris and Company facility in Chicago, IL. Over 50 engine companies responded to the incident, but because the city’s fire hydrants were shut off for the winter to prevent freezing, the blaze quickly spread out of control. The warehouse collapsed in the direction of the firefighters, burying dozens in the rubble and flames. Truckman Peter Powers, along with twenty-two other firefighters, were killed by the falling debris.