Richard Jeffrey “Rick” Feldman

Richard Jeffrey “Rick” Feldman

Being a firefighter was not just a job for Rick; it was a calling that continued the family legacy of his father.

When Rick became FAO, he said he had the best job ever! He enjoyed constantly learning new fire safety techniques and training. Rick was on the regional HAZMAT team, confined spaces, original member of the technical rescue team, and SCBA fit test technician.

The fire chief said there is not a friendlier person in the fire house than Rick; he would give you the shirt off his back and was a pleasure to work with. Rick tried to do his best on every call he responded to; he took his FAO responsibilities very seriously.

Rick was a people person and made friends easily. He enjoyed trying to make someone’s day a little better. He enjoyed cooking, took cooking classes, and shared what he made with others. Rick enjoyed camping, sailing, and going to baseball games with family and friends. As a family we enjoyed traveling, spending time at our cabin, and going to the lake.

Everything changed for us when Rick was diagnosed with a rare blood disease, angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma. During the 11 months he fought this disease, he took advantage of opportunities to spend time with his family and brothers from the fire department. When he couldn’t go outside, he enjoyed playing the piano and watching movies and baseball games together, creating as many memories as he could while he still had time.

Rick fought. He fought for the opportunity to make more memories with his children. Through his treatment, he never complained or gave up hope. He fought with a smile until the end. Growing up, my dad was always our hero and our biggest fan when we played sports or any extra school activities. My dad was the best man I knew and my best friend growing up. No matter what we were doing—camping, watching movies, or cooking together—we always had the best time.

He sometimes doubted whether he was a good dad, but to us there was no question. He was the best dad we could ever ask for. He taught us to be kind, work hard, and have a caring heart. To me, that is the best thing a dad could teach his kids. He wanted us to go into the world and spread kindness, and we try to be just like him.

He had so much he wanted to do with his children—teach them, watch them fall in love, and welcome their spouses into the family. He won’t have that opportunity. That is why Rick’s name being added to this memorial means so much to our family. This is a place his children and future grandchildren can see that his sacrifices to serve his community mattered. Rick will never be forgotten.

Thelonious “Theo” Adams

Thelonious “Theo” Adams

Captain Thelonious T. Adams, age 54, of the Las Vegas Fire Department, died on May 1, 2018, from injuries he sustained in an apparatus accident while responding to a reported structure fire on October 31, 2003.

Will Paulsen Hawkins

Will Paulsen Hawkins

Firefighter Jacob M. O’Malley, age 27, and Firefighter Will Paulsen Hawkins, age 22, of the Bureau of Land Management, Winnemucca District, died on July 10, 2016, after an apparatus accident.

Jacob M. O’Malley

Jacob M. O'Malley

Firefighter Jacob M. O’Malley, age 27, and Firefighter Will Paulsen Hawkins, age 22, of the Bureau of Land Management, Winnemucca District, died on July 10, 2016, after an apparatus accident.

Donovan Artie Garcia Jr.

Donovan Artie Garcia Jr.

Donovan Artie Garcia Jr., known lovingly as “Dondi,” was born August 27, 1961, in Reno, Nevada. Dondi was a member of the Reno/Sparks Indian Colony, descended from the Washoe tribe of California and Nevada and the Pyramid Lake Paiute tribe of Nevada. He was extremely proud of being a Native American firefighter and felt a special connection in defending and conserving his homeland.

Dondi loved his life of service. He graduated from the police academy in 1992 and became a Reno/Sparks Indian Colony police officer, serving his community for approximately five years. During this time, his lifelong twin best friends took him for a ride in their wildland fire engine. That day, his love changed from police work to firefighting, and soon he was off fighting fires across the United States as a professional wildland firefighter. Donovan’s proudest assignment came in February 2003 when he participated in the Columbia Shuttle recovery. This was a huge effort in which his team, along with many others, attempted to recover the remains of the seven astronauts and different items of the spacecraft.

Throughout Donovan’s career as an emergency responder, both career and volunteer, he acquired countless qualifications and certifications. He was a peace officer from the High Sierra Police Academy and received certifications in EMS and then as an EMT. His fire career began with the Bureau of Indian Affairs Western Nevada Agency (WNA), a 20-man hand crew based in Carson City, Nevada. He began working his way up the ladder as a basic wildland firefighter, advanced wildland firefighter, and single resource (crew boss). Later, he went to work with FireStop, a contract wildland engine company out of California, becoming qualified as an engine boss and engine operator.

After 14 seasons on the road as a professional wildland firefighter, Dondi retired, but fire passionately always boiled in his blood. In 2012, he was approached by the chief of the Hungry Valley Volunteer Fire Department, where his fellow members voted him to the rank of captain, then named him assistant chief. Dondi was ecstatic!

Donovan comes from a huge loving family as a son, the eldest of his siblings, brother, cousin, uncle, father, and grandfather. Dondi, a single father, raised his two youngest children, but passionately loved all his children. They couldn’t be any prouder of their father, as is the entire family. As a member of a big family, police, or fire crew/department, Donovan lived to serve others. His kindness and outrageous sense of humor are greatly missed. His name was added to the Nevada Firefighters’ Memorial in Carson City, Nevada, in 2014.

Rest in peace my father, my son, my brother, my friend. We will see you again.

Paul S. Cash

Paul S. Cash

Captain Paul Cash was a second-generation firefighter who began his career in June of 1988, as a seasonal firefighter for the Nevada Division of Forestry. Paul became a career firefighter with the NDF in May 1996 and was promoted to captain in July 2006.

He always enjoyed a challenge and had a very level head in the face of any adversity, which made him a natural leader. He was highly intelligent, had an addictive sense of humor, made friends easily, and was extremely well liked. Paul was a great friend, a great firefighter, a caring husband and, most importantly, a great father. He will be missed by all the people he knew, those whose lives he touched in the line of duty.

Paul is survived by his wife, Sherri, and his daughter, Ariel.

William Conrad Hartsell

William Conrad Hartsell

TSgt William (Bill) Conrad Hartsell was born on July 1‚ 1957 in Reedsville‚ West Virginia. He went home to the Lord on April 7‚ 1986‚ while serving as a firefighter in the United States Air Force‚ stationed at Nellis Air Force Base. He is survived by his wife Isabel Hartsell; two daughters Christina Drake and Elizabeth Hartsell; a brother David Hartsell; and his mother Alice Hartsell. Bill’s legacy continues on through his grandson‚ Noah Drake.

Bill was an honor roll student at Valley High School‚ where he graduated in 1975. He enlisted in the Air Force immediately following graduation. Bill received a degree in Fire Science from the Air Force Academy during his time in service. During his time at Valley High School and with the Air Force‚ he was an ardent fan of football and baseball‚ and was always involved in some form with one of the two.

Bill was best characterized by those who knew him as the guy who would lend a helping hand whenever he could. As a child and teenager‚ Bill would offer to carry groceries and take out fire ashes for his elderly neighbors. As a teenager‚ he would offer to tutor other kids in his high school to help them make better grades. After Bill joined the service‚ he would volunteer to work with handicapped children in his free time. It was no surprise that a man with such a big heart would choose to serve his country‚ especially as a firefighter‚ ready to help those urgently in need.

We thank God for the opportunity‚ though short‚ to have known such an amazing man. Bill accepted Jesus into his heart when he was jut nine years old. We put our trust in Jesus that we will see Bill again.

Richard Washington Jr.

There is no profile listed for this fallen firefighter.

Brian Bruns

Brian  Bruns

There is no profile listed for this fallen firefighter.

Steven R. Wass

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